Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

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The General
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Wed Mar 11, 2015 8:53 am

The General wrote:Image
Bedford OYC 3 ton tanker, Head Quarters, Royal Army Services Corps, WWII desert campaign


Another new edition:

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Bedford OYC 3 ton tanker, Eastern Command, 1941
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Sat Apr 18, 2015 1:41 am

The General wrote:Image
Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, 9th Survey Regiment, Royal Artillery

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Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, 11th African Division, Sudan 1941

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Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, 51st Highland Division

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Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, L.A.A. Brigade, Royal Artillery, Malta 1942

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Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, GHQ Land Forces, Middle East

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Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, London County Council, London Fire Brigade, WWII


...and another:

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Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, Medical truck, 1st Polish Army Division
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Tue Apr 21, 2015 10:17 am

The General wrote:Image
1937 Scammell Pioneer artillery tractor, Royal Artillery, 1st Army


Another newbie.....

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1937 Scammell Pioneer artillery tractor, captured Luftwaffe (Crete 1943)
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:08 am

The General wrote:Image
Bedford OX dropside, Royal Navy (WWII)


I grabbed a couple of these recently:

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Bedford OXD GS Cargo, 1st Armoured Division (The Rhinos) 1941
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Mon May 04, 2015 7:26 am

The General wrote:Image
Austin "Tilly" utility vehicle, Medical truck, 1st Polish Army Division


Another military ambulance release. Post war this time:

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Bedford J1 ambulance, Army Medical Services
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Sat Jun 13, 2015 9:03 pm

Some recent military Land Rover additions to the Oxford Military range:

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Land Rover Series II LWB Station Wagon, 44th Home Counties Infantry Div

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Land Rover Defender, Berlin Camouflage Scheme

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Land Rover Defender Station Wagon, Royal Air Force
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby Bill50 » Sat Jun 13, 2015 9:56 pm

Interesting story behind the Berlin camo.

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In 1982, the officer commanding the 4/7 Royal Dragoon Guards tank squadron in Berlin felt that the normal Deep Bronze Green paint scheme of the British Army was incompatible with its urban environment. The green/black camouflage was a poor alternative when viewed against the contemporary urban backdrop of post-WWII Berlin. Straight lines are hard to find in nature and the standard patterns of black and green are equally unnatural amid the masonry, brickwork, timber and steel window frames of a city.

One influence in developing a solution was the paint scheme used by the Royal Navy in WWI, also known as the "dazzle" scheme. It was intended not only to merge and conceal, but also to mislead. Ships were painted with bold, bright and confusing shapes, which recognised the disruption created by wave structures in order to make it difficult to identify not only the class of ship but also it's direction, speed and range. Zebra stripes presented many potential bows to the enemy, making it hard to judge direction and false bow waves were painted on to imply different speeds. You need to know the distance, speed and direction of travel in order to target a ship. Before radar targeting was available, stereo optical range finders were used, similar in method to split view focusing in cameras. You had to spot a distinct vertical surface on the ship. This is harder to do if the outlines are broken up and the essential information is harder to obtain. In WWI the dazzle ships were targeted slightly more often than the grey or other camo scheme ships. However, they were hit much less often than the others. It seems to have worked at that time and the British actually hired professional artists such as Norman Wilkinson to design their dazzle schemes and tailor them to individual ships during WWI.

All these visual clues were important when trying to acquire a target at sea, now redundant by modern methods of long range detection. However, they are still valid on land in an urban environment.

The element of surprise can be seen as a force multiplier. The Soviet tank aimer would have invested many hours studying NATO vehicles but confronted with an unfamiliar silhouette, he might have lost the initiative. Shoot or be shot at - any advantage through deception and misdirection by simple application of paint was worthy of investigation.

The Major experimented with cardboard silhouettes of the Chieftain Main Battle Tank (MBT) in the windows of his office. He noticed the repetition of vertical lines and by careful placement of different size squares and rectangles was able effectively to disguise the shape of the tank. The colours chosen, grey, white, brown and black, resembled the shades found on buildings, windows and doors. Irrespective of the size of vehicle, whether it is an MBT, APC or Land Rover, the blocks of colour are approximately eighteen inches square and should not be scaled up or down for different vehicles. Antennae were also a giveaway. If you were to break the vertical length of the aerial up into sections of different colour, it almost disappears, the visual clues no longer available.

Initial reactions from his soldiers went from amusement to grudging acceptance. It was a similar situation with his fellow officers. However, all realised the advantage to be gained and how effective it was at the right distances. Certain camouflage patterns are ineffective when close up but improve as the distances increase. In our case, 50 to 60 yards was the minimum, as you got further away the target almost disappeared at 100 yards.

Following acceptance and encouragement by his Brigade Commander, the opportunity arose to show it to the Corps Commander. He came to Berlin to see for himself. Allegedly, he said "I can't see your f*****g tank, must be a good idea" The paint scheme was adopted by the squadron and subsequently by all British forces in Berlin. Each vehicle was to be painted to the same pattern; the same size blocks of colour and pattern would make it harder to determine the strength of the British Forces because they all looked the same.


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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Sat Jun 13, 2015 11:10 pm

Great read. Cheers.
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Sun Aug 23, 2015 12:54 am

Picked up a few of these new WWII releases recently:

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Beford QLD cargo truck, British Army Fire Service
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Re: Oxford Diecast 1/76 Military Vehicles

Postby The General » Sat Oct 17, 2015 11:29 pm

The General wrote:CMP (Canadian Military Pattern) LAA tractor trucks

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3rd Canadian Infantry Division (North West Europe 1945)

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1st Canadian Army (United Kingdom 1944)

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1st Canadian Infantry Division (Italy 1944)

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41st L.A.A. Battery, 2nd NZ Infantry Division (Middle East 1942)


Looking forward to adding some of these newbies to my invasion force:

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1st Canadian Infantry Division (North West Europe 1945)
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